June 24, 2024

January is a very bad month, I can’t lie. Finding the will to leave the comforts of home is difficult because of the chilly and gloomy weather. Animals and plants slow down and take a break during the winter months in nature. It’s not quite a luxury enjoyed by modern people.

But, as we begin to make plans for the future and look forward to what may emerge in the new year, we can also view January as a period of limitless possibilities. To break the winter blues, exciting exhibitions are already filling Metro Detroit galleries. In the hopes that they would ignite my creative spark and inspire me to get outside of my shell, here are a few shows I’m eager to see if you’re ready to

A group show includes figurative works by Andre Barker, Kaleigh Blevins, Alicia Brown, Cydney Camp, Gregory Johnson, Bowen Kline, Joshua Rainer, Mieyoshi Ragernoir, and Shonobi will launch the year at this Ferndale gallery.

Janice Charach Gallery’s Beyond Topography (January 14–February 21)
Beyond Topography, an exhibition curated by Detroit artist Clinton Snider, presents the work of twenty-three artists who each have a unique perspective on the American landscape and its future. Taurus Burns, Mitch Cope, Joel Dugan, Bakpak Durden, Denise Whitebread Fanning, Adrian Hatfield, Scott Hocking, Andy Krieger, Michael McGillis, Lucille and Jim Nawara, Rebecca Reeder, Tylonn Sawyer, Graem Whyte, Anthony Maughan, Milee Tibbs, Alison Wong, Alex Martin, Mel Rosas, John Charnota, Faina Lerman, and Ivan Montoya are among the artists with pieces included in it, in addition to it. The new futuristic AI pieces by Tylonn Sawyer that are included in the show most intrigue us.

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Janice Charach Gallery’s Beyond Topography (January 14–February 21)
Beyond Topography, an exhibition curated by Detroit artist Clinton Snider, presents the work of twenty-three artists who each have a unique perspective on the American landscape and its future. Taurus Burns, Mitch Cope, Joel Dugan, Bakpak Durden, Denise Whitebread Fanning, Adrian Hatfield, Scott Hocking, Andy Krieger, Michael McGillis, Lucille and Jim Nawara, Rebecca Reeder, Tylonn Sawyer, Graem Whyte, Anthony Maughan, Milee Tibbs, Alison Wong, Alex Martin, Mel Rosas, John Charnota, Faina Lerman, and Ivan Montoya are among the artists with pieces included in it, in addition to it. The new futuristic AI pieces by Tylonn Sawyer that are included in the show most intrigue us.

In just three years, Metro Detroit’s art studio for artists with developmental challenges and mental health problems has secured a museum show.

The Progressive Art Studio Collective (PASC) is the first art studio and program of its kind in Wayne County and Detroit, having opened its doors in 2021. Of the 175 artists that make up PASC, 37 exhibit a variety of media in the exhibition Intimacy: The Artistic Community of PASC at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit.

The program’s objective, according to PASC Program Manager Anthony Marcellini, is to assist these artists in pursuing prosperous modern careers despite developmental and mental health issues.

Instead of giving the artists any direction at PASC’s open studios, the staff encourages them to work freely while emphasizing positive reinforcement. Three studios are located in Detroit, Southgate, and Warren. The organization is a program under Services to Enhance Potential (STEP). PASC will relocate its Detroit studio to a gallery area in the upcoming Lantern project by Library Street Collective in the spring.

“It’s not like art school, where my teachers told me things like ‘that’s been done before,’ or ‘only one of you will ever make it as an artist,'” Marcellini claims. It’s more like ‘Go on.'” Take on more. Do you want to give this new content a try? How about we give this thing a try?

He goes on, “It’s really about creating an environment where folks who don’t frequently get that can be independent, autonomous, and free to express themselves creatively and interact in different ways. For certain individuals, writing or spoken communication is not always the main mode of communication. Another highly soothing pastime is creating art. Therefore, that studio feature is crucial. In that way, it’s a very restorative environment.

MOCAD’s Mike Kelley’s Space for Public Good program includes intimacy.

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Abel González Fernández was entrusted with developing programming related to the community care legacy of the Mike Kelly Mobile Homestead when he started working as an assistant curator at MOCAD about six months ago.

Johanna Ulevich was taken aback to see people mocking a hat composed of a random assortment of vibrant yarns with different textures when she went into a Reddit chat board for crafters. The retail business Urban Outfitters was selling a hat that was strikingly similar to her own style of art, which she termed “YARNMAGEDDON.”

“There was a post about the hat saying it was ugly,” Ulevich (who happens to be this reporter’s buddy) explains. “And I thought, YARNMAGEDDON, HOLD UP!”

“Clearly, [I was] not offended [because] the point of YARNMAGEDDON is to be ugly,” the speaker continues.

She claims that the product’s striking resemblance to her own designs was what angered her.

In 2021, Ulevich launched her YARNMAGEDDON collection, which featured a performance at the Eat Da

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