June 24, 2024

According to a complaint, dead prisoners were found to have missing parts such as the brain and heart.

According to a complaint, the families of two prisoners who died while incarcerated in Alabama allegedly received their bodies back with missing hearts or other parts.

In November, 43-year-old Brandon Clay Dotson passed away in a jail in Alabama. The Independent was able to get court documents that showed his body was supposedly rotting and that his heart was missing when it was delivered to his family.

Years prior, Charlene Drake experienced a similar circumstance when her father, Charles Edward Singleton, was brought home following his death in the Alabama jail system, devoid of all internal organs, including his brain.

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In an attempt to ascertain why his remains were there, the Dotson family chose to bring a federal lawsuit against the Alabama Department of Corrections and other parties.

However, nobody appears to understand why his heart suddenly disappeared. According to local outlet AL.com, the court attempted to determine where it might have gone on January 5 but no one provided any explanations during the three-hour session.

Five witnesses, including the director of Alabama’s forensic sciences department, the head of autopsies at UAB, a warden, commissioner, and deputy chief commissioner of the state’s correctional department, all stated they were unsure of the location of the missing heart.

According to prison system attorneys, Dotson’s heart was still within his body when his remains were removed from the facility, and they did not possess it, the source reported.

The finding was made when Dotson’s family, suspecting foul play in his death, engaged a second pathologist to do an autopsy on his remains.

The pathologist found that the heart was missing when he began to examine the remains.

The University of Alabama’s medical school was mentioned in the lawsuit as a potential “intended recipient” of Dotson’s heart.

But according to reports, the university’s lawyers denied performing the autopsy or receiving any of Dotson’s organs, calling the claim a “bald speculation” in court documents.

During a hearing, it was purportedly revealed that the Alabama Department of Forensics conducted Dotson’s autopsy.

The finding was made when Dotson’s family, suspecting foul play in his death, engaged a second pathologist to do an autopsy on his remains.

Muscle Shoals Alabama Usa June 26 Stock Photo 2323236947 | Shutterstock

The pathologist found that the heart was missing when he began to examine the remains.

The University of Alabama’s medical school was mentioned in the lawsuit as a potential “intended recipient” of Dotson’s heart.

But according to reports, the university’s lawyers denied performing the autopsy or receiving any of Dotson’s organs, calling the claim a “bald speculation” in court documents.

During a hearing, it was purportedly revealed that the Alabama Department of Forensics conducted Dotson’s autopsy.

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